The Evolving Image of Mining

The Evolving Image of Mining

Areas of Study: Environment and Community

Qualifies for CMS

Qualifies for Certification

This is a course for managers, professionals, students and concerned stakeholders in mining who require a better understanding of the impacts of mining on the environment and communities.The course discusses the underlying causes which have shaped the public's evolving perception of the mining industry and presents ways in which mining companies can overcome these perceptions.

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  • Audience Level:
  • New to Mining
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 7 hours

Course Summary

Introduction

This is a course for managers, professionals, students and concerned stakeholders in mining who require a better understanding of the impacts of mining on the environment and communities.The course discusses the underlying causes which have shaped the public's evolving perception of the mining industry and presents ways in which mining companies can overcome these perceptions.

The following subjects are covered:

  • Separating Fact from Fiction
  • Characteristics of Mining
  • Canadian Mining Facts
  • Mining Images - OK Tedi, Porgera, Grasberg and others
  • Public Perception of Mining
  • Promotion of Mining
  • Mining and Communities
  • Adding Value to Communities

Content

The course is presented as 10 learning sessions, each of 30 to 60 minutes duration. It includes three interactive review sessions for verification of course learning objectives. Total course duration is equivalent to approximately 7 hours of learning content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the evolution of the public image of mining.
  • Discuss the responsibilities of a mining company with respect to the impact of mining on the environment and communities.
  • Apply the knowledge gained to a better appreciation of how their activities in mining can contribute to sustainable development.

Recommended Background

  • A basic understanding of the mining process and its contributions and impacts on society.

Marcello Veiga

Dr. Marcello Veiga has worked for the past twenty five years as a metallurgical engineer and environmental geochemist for mining and consulting companies in Brazil, Canada, US, Venezuela, Chile and Peru. He has worked extensively on environmental and social issues related to mining. As a professor of the Department of Mining Engineering at the University of British Columbia, since 1997, his research topics include: sustainable development in mining, mine closure and reclamation, remedial procedures for metal pollution (in particular mercury pollution, bioaccumulation and adverse effects of metals in the environment), acid rock drainage, and mineral processing. For 2 years, he worked as an expert for UNIDO - United Nations Industrial Development Organization, in Vienna, on issues related to artisanal gold mining in Asia, Africa and South America. Since Aug 2004, he is back to UBC to his academic activities.

Stephen Roberts

Dr. Roberts é bacharel em ciência política pela Universidade de Queen (1983) bem como um M.Land.Arch. em Arquitetura Paisagística pela Universidade de British Columbia (1999) e um Ph.D . em mineração pela University of British Columbia (2005).

Dr. Roberts é um graduado recente da Universidade da Colúmbia Britânica. Trabalhando em colaboração com Highland Valle Copper Ltd., o foco de sua pesquisa de doutorado foi sobre a identificação dos fatores dominantes que influenciam a percepção das partes interessadas sobre a utilidade do planejamento do fechamento para ajudar uma comunidade em sua transição para uma economia pós-encerramento. Dr. Roberts está atualmente trabalhando em um projeto para determinar a viabilidade de rejeitos re-mineração a partir de uma mina de prata abandonada no Centro de Ontário.