Sustainable Development in Mining

Sustainable Development in Mining

Areas of Study: Environment and Community

Qualifies for CMS

Qualifies for Certification

This is a course for managers, professionals, students and concerned stakeholders in mining who require an understanding of the concepts and issues of sustainable development. The course is illustrated by numerous case studies and examples from mining projects, and supported by a discussion of mineral consumption, recycling and resource depletion.

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  • Audience Level:
  • Professional
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 14 hours

Course Summary

Introduction

This course is intended for a broad-based audience of managers, professionals, students and concerned stakeholders in mining who require an understanding of the concepts and issues of sustainable development.

Sustainable Development in Mining focuses on the underlying concepts and issues that apply specifically to the mining industry. Included are the sustainable development concepts of...

  • economic growth that preserves the earth's biophysical integrity;
  • optimization of the societal benefits of economic development;
  • system quality... which systems should be preserved/improved;
  • a more equitable distribution of the benefits and burdens of economic growth ... both within the present generation and between present and future generations;
  • greater public participation in the decision-making process.
These concepts are illustrated by numerous case studies and examples from mining projects, and further supported by a discussion of mineral consumption, recycling and resource depletion.

Content

The main topics covered by the course include...

  • a brief history of sustainable development;
  • ethics, the environment and their relationship with sustainable development;
  • implications of sustainable development for the mining industry;
  • case studies in the mining industry;
  • mineral consumption, recycling and mineral depletion.
The course is presented as 16 learning sessions, each of 30 to 60 minutes duration. It includes four interactive review sessions for verification of course learning objectives. Total course duration is equivalent to approximately 14 hours of learning content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the concepts and issues of sustainable development as they apply to the mining industry.
  • Apply the knowledge gained to better recognize how their activities in mining can contribute to sustainable development.

Recommended Background

  • A basic understanding of the mining process and its contributions and impacts on society.

Marcello Veiga

Dr. Marcello Veiga has worked for the past twenty five years as a metallurgical engineer and environmental geochemist for mining and consulting companies in Brazil, Canada, US, Venezuela, Chile and Peru. He has worked extensively on environmental and social issues related to mining. As a professor of the Department of Mining Engineering at the University of British Columbia, since 1997, his research topics include: sustainable development in mining, mine closure and reclamation, remedial procedures for metal pollution (in particular mercury pollution, bioaccumulation and adverse effects of metals in the environment), acid rock drainage, and mineral processing. For 2 years, he worked as an expert for UNIDO - United Nations Industrial Development Organization, in Vienna, on issues related to artisanal gold mining in Asia, Africa and South America. Since Aug 2004, he is back to UBC to his academic activities.

Stephen Roberts

Dr. Roberts has a B.A. in Political Science from Queen's University (1983), an M.Land.Arch. in Landscape Architecture from the University of British Columbia (1999), and a Ph.D. in Mining from the University of British Columbia (2005).

Working in collaboration with Highland Valley Copper Ltd., the focus of his doctoral research was on identifying the dominant factors that influence stakeholder perceptions of the usefulness of closure planning to assist a community in its transition to a post-closure economy. Dr. Roberts is currently working on a project to determine the feasibility of re-mining tailings from an abandoned silver mine in Central Ontario.