Rock Mass Classification for Mine Design

Rock Mass Classification for Mine Design

Areas of Study: Geotechnics

Qualifies for CMS

This course provides mine staff with the tools required to effectively gather geotechnical data for rock mass classification and rock mechanics design calculations.

Author:

Online Course Online Courses

Enroll for Access to All Online Courses

Enrollees have access to all self-paced online courses.

  • Audience Level:
  • Professional
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 15 hours

Certify to Test Your Knowledge, and Earn a Certificate

Certification is optional. Enrollment is required for Certification.

  • Fee for Certification:
  • Not Available
  • Completion:
  • 30 days
  • CEUs:
  • 1.5 (15 PDHs)

Course Summary

Introduction

The purpose of this course is to provide mine staff the tools required to effectively gather geotechnical data for rock mass classification and rock mechanics design calculations. The majority of rock falls in mine operations are structurally controlled. Design is largely controlled by existing structure. It is critical that site characterization be performed so as to identify the structural factors that would affect rock slope angles, drill and blast design, support requirements, resultant dilution and span design, etc. A good understanding of rock mass structure forms the basis of rock mass classification which is used in the majority of rock mechanics design methods.

Upon completion of the course students are able to gather geotechnical data, either from rock cuts, drifts or core, and process the information for subsequent analysis. The focus of the course is towards gathering information for purposes of analysis and design. The goal is to use effective mapping techniques to obtain data that can be used as input for any of the established rock classification systems. All of the commonly used classification values such as Barton's Q and Q' systems, Bieniawski's RMR, Laubscher's MRMR and Hoek's GSI systems are covered.

Course Content

The course comprises 21 viewing sessions of 30-60 minutes each at the text level, plus multiple-choice reviews, extensive worked examples, and numerous illustrations and supporting tables. Estimated course duration is equivalent to approximately 15 hours of viewing content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Gather geotechnical data, either from rock cuts, drifts or core, and process the information for subsequent analysis.
  • Apply this information to classification systems such as Barton's Q and Q' systems, Bieniawski's RMR, Laubscher's MRMR and Hoek's GSI for subsequent design purposes.

Recommended Background

  • A degree in mining or geotechnical engineering, engineering geology or related discipline.
  • Experience with underground and/or surface excavation in rock.

Dr. Doug Milne

Doug Milne is a geological engineer with an MSc and PhD in mining rock mechanics. He has over 20 years industry experience in surface and underground rock mechanics and he teaches rock mechanics at the University of Saskatchewan. Doug's MSc research was on rock mass classification systems; he has written several papers on classification and worked in the field gathering data for classification and design. Doug has also co-chaired a workshop on rock classification.