Risk Assessment, Decision-Making, and Engineering Management for Mine Geowaste Facilities

Risk Assessment, Decision-Making, and Engineering Management for Mine Geowaste Facilities

Areas of Study: Geotechnics

Qualifies for CMS

Qualifies for Certification

This course is about the concepts, techniques, and tools for risk assessment and decision making applicable to the management of mine geowaste facilities.

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  • Audience Level:
  • Professional
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 19 hours

Course Summary

Introduction

This course is about the concepts, techniques, and tools for risk assessment and decision-making applicable to the management of mine geowaste facilities. The course focuses on managing the design, operation, and closure of mine waste facilities such as tailings facilities, waste rock dumps, and spent heap leach pads using risk assessment, formal decision-making methods, and management tools and procedures.

The topics addressed are key to the success of mining projects and their impact on the environment, as closed mine waste disposal facilities are new terraforms that will be there in perpetuity. If they are designed, constructed, operated, and closed properly, the mine is justifiable; if not, the mine should not be allowed to open or operate. If the geowaste facility is part of a mine that generates corporate and social benefits and entails risks that are below tolerable thresholds, then the mine is sustainable and can be allowed to operate. If the risks are not manageable, the mine may not be opened.

Course Content

Risk Assessment, Decision-Making, and Engineering Management for Mine Geowaste Facilities is structured in five parts and a total of 18 viewing sessions of approximately 60 minutes each, plus course reviews. Current course duration is equivalent to approximately 19 hours of viewing content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Recognize the different phases of mining from exploration through feasibility, design, construction, operation, and closure
  • Identify the principles and methods of risk assessment, decision making, and the management of mine waste disposal facilities.
  • Be able to use the concepts and principles of risk assessment and decision making in your engineering technical, environmental, social, and management practices and undertakings.

Recommended Background

  • A degree, diploma or interest in engineering, geology, or environmental science.
  • An interest and desire to use risk assessment and decision making methods in your mine waste management practice and involvement.

Jack Caldwell

Jack Caldwell, P.Eng, has a B.Sc. in Civil Engineering, an M.Sc. (Eng.) in Geotechnical Engineering and a post-graduate law degree. He has over 35 years engineering experience on mining, civil, geotechnical and site remediation projects. He has worked on numerous projects throughout southern Africa, Europe, Latin America, Canada, and the United States. His project experience includes:

- mines and waste disposal facilities - design, construction supervision and reclamation of tailings impoundments, mine rock dumps, heap leach pads, landfills and radioactive waste disposal units;

- hazardous and radioactive waste site remediation - senior management and technical consultant

- landfills - design, construction, operation and closure with special focus on liners, covers, and soil reinforcement.

In addition, Mr. Caldwell has been the lead specialist for various geotechnical and civil engineering projects in Southern California. Mr. Caldwell has written many engineering reports, proposals, and technical papers. He is the lead author of the book, Principles and Practice of Waste Encapsulation, on the design of waste disposal facilities for radioactive and hazardous wastes.

Franco Oboni

After two decades of intense geotechnical and contracting experience, above and underground, Franco slowly but surely pivoted towards risk engineering, an arena in which he has been internationally active for over two decades. Franco manages a broad range of risk and crisis mitigation projects for major mining companies all over the world. Projects include negotiations with community leaders, Quantitative Risk Assessments, Optimum Risk Estimates (ORE ©Riskope, 2010–present) and third party reviews. Franco has over fifty published papers and is co-author of the 2007 book entitled: “Improving Sustainability through Reasonable Risk and Crisis Management”. Franco delivers customized seminars world-wide and was co-recipient of the Italian Canadian Chamber of Commerce (Canada West) 2010 Innovation Award. His clients include international mining companies, UNDP, Fortune 500, World Bank, railroads, highways, harbors, luxury and food suppliers, military and numerous communities, regional and provincial governments.

Cesar Oboni

Cesar is involved in quantitative risk analyses and third party reviews for mining operations, mining logistics, commercial wharves, production facilities and environmental protection “at perpetuity” projects. Cesar has been very active in the analysis of special and emerging risks, co-authoring a report on Cyber-defence at national scale for a European country. In various projects Cesar created a link between Risk Analysis and mitigative action plans considering Health & Safety, societal acceptability, willingness to pay and other social drivers. His clients include Fortune 500, large mining corporations, UN/UNDP, transportation companies and military. Cesar is the co-author of the 2007 book entitled: “Improving Sustainability through Reasonable Risk and Crisis Management” and over fifteen papers published in international conferences and symposiums. He was co-recipient of the 2010 ICCC, Italian Canadian Chamber of Commerce (Canada West), Innovation Award.