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Online Course

Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals

Author:

  • Format: Online Course Tool Tip
  • Application: Mineralogy - Mineral Processing Tool Tip
  • Audience Level: Professional Tool Tip
  • Certification: EduMine Tool Tip
  • Fee for Certification: $300 Tool Tip
  • Enrollment: Required Tool Tip
  • Version: January 21, 2005 Tool Tip
  • Duration: 20 hours Tool Tip
  • Completion: 40 days Tool Tip
  • CEUs: 2.0 (20 PDHs) Tool Tip
Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals

Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals is the first of two courses on process mineralogy by the author. It presents the basic tools of investigative and analytical mineralogy and their application primarily with respect to metals, illustrated by numerous examples. Topics covered include optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, electron microscopy, mineral separation and mass balance techniques. Together with the companion course, Process Mineralogy 2 for Coal and Industrial Minerals, this course provides an excellent introduction to process mineralogy for all mining disciplines.

Course Summary

Introduction

Process mineralogy combines mineralogical techniques with mineral process unit operations to identify minerals, their associations and characteristics in order to...

  • establish feasibility concepts at the early stages of geological exploration;
  • design processing flowsheets;
  • specify raw materials and marketable products;
  • troubleshoot plants;
  • indicate new uses of minerals.
Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals presents the basic tools of process mineralogy and their application primarily with respect to metals, illustrated by numerous examples. Topics covered include the following.

  • Importance of process mineralogy for mining, mineral processing and metallurgy; definition of raw materials; different sources of raw materials; techniques used in process mineralogy; important mineralogical aspects for mineral concentration and leaching.
  • Analytical techniques used in process mineralogy to identify and quantify minerals and for chemical analysis; principles of optical microscopy; use of the polarizing microscope to identify minerals; transmitted and reflected light.
  • Quantitative mineralogical analysis using optical microscopy; point counting; degree of liberation by the Gaudin method; image analysis.
  • Mineralogical analysis by x-ray diffraction; principles of x-ray generation and diffraction; quantitative XRD methods; use of x-ray fluorescence for chemical analysis.
  • Electron microscopy; scanned and transmitted beams; interaction of electrons with matter; x-ray maps; identification of minerals.
  • Quantitative mineralogical analysis using mineral separation; heavy liquid separation; density gradient; study of mineral liberation using heavy liquids and flotation; study of gold liberation.
  • Quantitative mineralogical analysis based on chemical composition of minerals; mass balance techniques.
Application of process mineralogy to coal and industrial minerals is covered in a companion course titled Process Mineralogy 2 for Coal and Industrial Minerals.

Course Content

Process Mineralogy 1 for Metals comprises 20 viewing sessions at both summary and text level of 30 to 60 minutes duration each, plus multiple-choice reviews, and numerous figures, design tables and references. Course duration is equivalent to approximately 20 hours of viewing content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the importance of process mineralogy for mining, mineral processing and metallurgy.
  • Discuss the principles of optical microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, electron microscopy, mineral separation and mass balance techniques and their application in process mineralogy.
  • Discuss the use of these tools for investigative and quantitative mineralogical analysis.

Course Requirements

  • A partial degree or diploma in geology, mineral processing, mining engineering or related discipline.
  • An understanding of the basic physical and chemical principles of mineralogy and mineral processing.

Dr. Marcello Veiga

Dr. Marcello Veiga has worked for the past twenty five years as a metallurgical engineer and environmental geochemist for mining and consulting companies in Brazil, Canada, US, Venezuela, Chile and Peru. He has worked extensively on environmental and social issues related to mining. As a professor of the Department of Mining Engineering at the University of British Columbia, since 1997, his research topics include: sustainable development in mining, mine closure and reclamation, remedial procedures for metal pollution (in particular mercury pollution, bioaccumulation and adverse effects of metals in the environment), acid rock drainage, and mineral processing. For 2 years, he worked as an expert for UNIDO - United Nations Industrial Development Organization, in Vienna, on issues related to artisanal gold mining in Asia, Africa and South America. Since Aug 2004, he is back to UBC to his academic activities.