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Online Course

Probability Graphs and their Application in Mineral Exploration

Author:

  • Format: Online Course Tool Tip
  • Application: Exploration - Geology - Reserves Tool Tip
  • Audience Level: Professional Tool Tip
  • Certification: EduMine Tool Tip
  • Fee for Certification: $131 Tool Tip
  • Enrollment: Required Tool Tip
  • Version: December 21, 2012 Tool Tip
  • Duration: 7 hours Tool Tip
  • Completion: 20 days Tool Tip
  • CEUs: 0.7 (7 PDHs) Tool Tip
Probability Graphs and their Application in Mineral Exploration

This course, designed as a “hands-on” to the understanding and use of probability graphs, is patterned after a practical manual (Sinclair (1976)) on the subject. Content is organized on the philosophy that the best introduction to a subject is a clear-cut, idealized approach illustrated by ‘real life’ practical examples.

Course Summary

Introduction

Probability graphs are of practical use in many different fields of endeavour. In many applications, however, they appear to be used without a full appreciation of the implications and, in some cases, conclusions drawn from them are incorrect. This course, designed as a “hands-on” to the understanding and use of probability graphs, is patterned after a practical manual (Sinclair (1976)) on the subject. Content is organized on the philosophy that the best introduction to a subject is a clear-cut, idealized approach illustrated by ‘real life’ practical examples.

In this course the author focuses on the application of probability graphs to mineral exploration, illustrated with numerous practical examples.

Content

The course comprises 12 viewing sessions at both summary and text level, plus multiple-choice reviews and worked examples, and a comprehensive glossary. Course duration is equivalent to 7 hours of study content.

Learning Outcomes

  • A practical appreciation of the use of probability graphs in a mineral exploration context.

Course Requirements

  • A working knowledge of simple statistical concepts such as arithmetic mean, variance, standard deviation, normal density distribution.
  • Familiarity with the basic objectives of mineral exploration.

Alastair J. Sinclair

Alastair J. Sinclair obtained his B.A.Sc. and M.A.Sc. degrees in geological engineering from the University of Toronto (1957 and 1958) and a Ph.D. in Economic Geology from the University of British Columbia (1964). From 1962 to 1964 he taught in the Dept. of Geology, University of Washington, Seattle; and from 1964 to 1998 taught at the University of British Columbia.

In addition to teaching at UBC he was Head of the Department of Geological Sciences (1985-1990) and Director of Geological Engineering (1991-1998). He is presently Professor Emeritus in geological engineering at the University of British Columbia. For many years he taught courses in Economic Geology, Mineral Inventory Estimation and Mineralography and Ore Microscopy. His research activities have focused on Mineral Exploration Data Analysis, Resource Estimation of Mineral Deposits and Quality Control Aspects of Resource Evaluation.

He has presented a wide range of short courses for mining companies and professional organizations and has consulted widely for the international mining industry; he continues to be active in these fields.