Mineral Project Reporting Under NI 43-101 (a CIM Course)

Areas of Study: Exploration and Geology

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A course for professional engineers and geoscientists concerned with mineral project reporting for an issuer on a Canadian stock exchange. This course is also a reference source of mineral project reporting standards for property owners, securities analysts, investors and regulators. This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME).

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  • Audience Level:
  • Professional
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 12 hours

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  • Fee for Certification:
  • Not Available
  • Completion:
  • 24 days
  • CEUs:
  • 1.2 (12 PDHs)

Course Summary

Introduction

Mineral Project Reporting Under NI43-101 is a course for professional engineers and geoscientists concerned with mineral project reporting for an issuer on a Canadian stock exchange. It is also a reference source of mineral project reporting standards for property owners, securities analysts and regulators.

The course provides guidance for the preparation of a technical report under National Instrument 43-101 - Standards of Disclosure for Mineral Projects, Form 43-101 F1 - Technical Report, and Companion Policy 43-101 CP (NI 43-101). NI 43-101 establishes the standards for all public disclosure of scientific and technical information about a mineral project. NI 43-101 became effective on February 1, 2001 and is a law that is applicable across Canada. It requires that all disclosure be based on advice provided by a "Qualified Person" and in some circumstances that the person be independent of the issuer and the property. NI 43-101 also requires that issuers file technical reports at specific times and in a prescribed format.

This course has been revised to the version of National Instrument 43-101 published April 8, 2011, which became effective law in Canada on June 30, 2011.

Course Content

Mineral Project Reporting Under NI43-101 consists of 15 viewing sessions of 30–60 minutes each with supporting references and interactive course reviews. The course includes PDF versions of NI 43-101 and many of the supporting references. Course duration is equivalent to approximately 12 hours of viewing content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Apply the requirements of NI 43-101 to mineral project reporting.

Recommended Background

  • An engineer or a geoscientist with at least five years of mineral project experience.
  • Membership of a self-regulatory professional association that is recognized by statute.

John Postle

John Postle has been a Consulting Mining Engineer and principal with Roscoe Postle Associates Inc. since its founding in 1985. Mr. Postle provides mining consulting services to a number of international financial institutions, corporations, utilities and law firms. He was previously a Senior Associate with David S. Robertson & Associates. Prior to that he worked for several years for two major mining companies at a number of open pit and underground operations in both operating and planning capacities. He is a Past Chairman of the Mineral Economics Committee of the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM), and was appointed a Distinguished Lecturer of the CIM in 1991. In 1997, he was awarded the CIM Robert Elver Mineral Economics Award. He is currently Co-Chairman of a CIM Standing Committee on Ore Reserve Definitions.

Mr. Postle has extensive experience in mining operations, planning and management. As a mining consultant since 1976, he has been involved in a variety of assignments, including valuations of mineral projects, review of feasibility studies, monitoring of mine construction, reviews of ore reserves, estimation and confirmation of operating and capital costs, conceptual mine design, and cash flow modelling.

Mr. Postle has a B.A.Sc. in Mining Engineering from the University of British Columbia and an M.Sc. in Earth Sciences from Stanford University. He is a member of several professional associations, and has published articles, addressed professional groups and appeared on television as a guest commentator.