Hide this alert
Online Course

Hazards, Safety and Security Management of Mining Transportation on Off-Site Roads

Authors: ,

  • Format: Online Course Tool Tip
  • Application: Management - Risk - Financial Tool Tip
  • Audience Level: Professional Tool Tip
  • Certification: EduMine Tool Tip
  • Fee for Certification: $131 Tool Tip
  • Enrollment: Required Tool Tip
  • Version: September 11, 2012 Tool Tip
  • Duration: 7 hours Tool Tip
  • Completion: 20 days Tool Tip
  • CEUs: 0.7 (7 PDHs) Tool Tip

Off-site road transportation to mining operations poses a series of unique challenges to people in charge of their Safety, Security and Hazard Management. This course draws information from a number of real life studies, and presents them following the logic of a Safety, Security and Hazard Management Report that could be prepared for a mine access road.

Course Summary

Introduction

Off-site road transportation (access roads) to mining operations (public or private, semi-private) poses a series of unique challenges to people in charge of their Safety, Security and Hazard Management.

This course draws information from a number of real life studies performed on this type of road by the authors, and presents them following the logic of a Safety, Security and Hazard Management Report that could be prepared for a mine access road going from fictional "Gate A" to "Mine B," crossing a variety of terrain and subject to an array of geo-environmental and human-made hazards. This course is generic enough to be relevant to various different situations and environments around the world.

The course is divided into five steps, which correspond to those necessary to compile a Safety, Security and Hazard Management Report, namely:

  • Step 1: Preliminary Data Gathering;
  • Step 2: Generic Preliminary Inspection/Review of the Road;
  • Step 3: Specific Aspects Linked to Mining Roads;
  • Step 4: Hazard Identification Primer; and
  • Step 5: Possible Mitigations.
Steps 1 through 3 are combined in Part 1: Introduction and Preliminary Tasks. Step 4 is presented in Part 2: Hazard Identification Primer, and Step 5 is found in Part 3: Possible Mitigations. Three technical appendices deliver specific information that will help road managers to design specific signals and signage.

This course makes references to prior Edumine courses by F. Oboni and C. Oboni (Risk and Decision Making and Engineering for Success in Mining) whenever necessary, but neither requires their knowledge nor repeats any information already presented on risk assessment, risk, or management.

Learning Outcomes

  • An understanding of the principles of hazard identification for mine access roads.
  • Awareness of risk and possible mitigation measures and their implementation.

Course Requirements

  • Experience of mining operations
  • An understanding of the basic principles of risk and probability theory

Franco Oboni

Dr. Oboni is the Principal Engineer and President of Oboni and Associates, based in Morrens, Switzerland and Vancouver, Canada. He has conducted a broad range of engineering projects, risk audits and geo-environmental hazard mitigation studies as well as planning and management of a wide variety of multi-disciplinary studies. These projects include short term missions on five continents, definition of needs studies, negotiations with community leaders, as well as the preparation of monitoring programs, cyclic risk reassessment and updating of probabilistic analyses after unusual events.

With his strong practical and applied engineering/contracting background, coupled with long term research development and continuous scientific updating, Dr. Oboni has been involved in risk and hazard analyses for a number of large facilities and organizations, including large linear facilities (railroads, highways, pipelines) and large hydropower projects. Dr. Oboni has supported numerous studies involving the use of innovative mitigative designs and construction techniques, and has provided alternatives evaluation, including financial life-cycle analysis for solid and liquid waste facilities throughout the world.

Dr. Oboni has led multinational groups in the accomplishment of extremely complicated tasks in a timely and effective manner. Assignments include numerous expert missions in Europe and overseas (Cameroon, Chad, Canada, Gabon, Madagascar, Chile, Philippines, Oman, Algeria), including on-site consultation, forensic, expert witness and troubleshooting.

The author of over 30 publications presented in international journals, Dr. Oboni has also lectured for numerous universities, laboratories and organizations in Asia, North America and Europe. He is also the author of a fiction book, entitled "The Omani Link".

Cesar Oboni

Cesar has been applications developer and project team member, and is currently director of modelling for a broad range of risk and crisis mitigation projects, risk and security audits and geo-environmental hazard mitigation studies. Projects include a wide selection of applications in the international arena.

Cesar offers an exceptional combination of technical expertise and algorithm design capabilities, which are intermingled with his deep understanding of cross-cultural environments matured over three continents (Europe, North America and Japan).

Since the inception of his career, Cesar has been involved in risk and hazard analyses for a number of large facilities and organizations, including communities, military, food and non-food industries, large linear facilities (railroads, highways, pipelines, tunnels, power lines). A major endeavor has been a study on 50 years history of typhoons in Japan with a quantitative discussion of the Japanese Government Mitigative Policies in relation to risk societal acceptability and WTP (willingness to pay) concepts.

Lately Cesar has been involved in projects dealing with information warfare for heavy natural resources industry, and developing synthetic environments for training of key personnel. His work has lead to a first in the world: a country-wide risk map for unexploded remnants of war (UXO) in Lao PDR and a risk model for UXO contaminated communities which greatly improves the tasking prioritization and allows better allotment of funds in mined countries.