Guidelines for Frontline Supervisors

Guidelines for Frontline Supervisors

Areas of Study: Management

Qualifies for CMS

This course presents the role, responsibilities, and required skill set of a good supervisor, the workforce dynamics of a supervisory role, and the importance of good employee training and evaluation programs.

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  • Audience Level:
  • Technical
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 10 hours

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Certification is optional. Enrollment is required for Certification.

  • Fee for Certification:
  • Not Available
  • Completion:
  • 20 days
  • CEUs:
  • 1.0 (10 PDHs)

Course Summary

Introduction

The intent of this course is to provide access to the author's 40+ years of supervisory experience to those that wish to augment and strengthen the skill set required to be an effective supervisor.

A supervisor's area of expertise is first and foremost the management of a workforce, with the emphasis on management. This means that a supervisor isn't simply a motivator or a task master. A supervisor must also possess, in part, the skills and/or knowledge of a mediator, a labour lawyer, a mining inspector, a trainer, a secretary, and an office manager, not to mention the technical skills required to manage the equipment and processes that are part of their responsibility matrix. The single common factor in all of these disciplines is people. The goal of this course is to demystify a great deal of the interaction between the supervisor and worker, the supervisor and upper management, and the supervisor and the various regulations that have an impact on a frontline supervisor's performance. It also provides the information necessary to increase proficiency in evaluation, accident/incident investigation, communication, confrontation, training, and more.

It should also be mentioned that worldwide mining laws and customs are very diverse; the legal information given here should be verified locally, and some of the workforce interaction techniques may have to be modified to suit local conditions. Every effort has been made to prevent misinterpretations from occurring, but they sometimes do occur, so please do your due diligence. Any manager, regardless of rank, industry or locality, should find the concepts and information presented informative and helpful.

Guidelines for Frontline Supervisors comprises five parts.

  • Introduction to Supervision
  • Management Skills
  • Workforce Dynamics
  • Training
  • Evaluations

Course Content

The course is presented as 13 learning sessions, each of 30 to 60 minutes duration, plus figures, schematics, and interactive course reviews that confirm achievement of the learning objectives. Total course duration is equivalent to approximately 10 hours of learning content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Identify the role and responsibilities of a supervisor.
  • Identify the skills required to be an efficient supervisor.
  • Identify the workforce dynamics of a supervisory role, particularly with respect to maintaining authority, employee handling, and conflict management.
  • Recognize the importance of good employee training programs and employee evaluation programs.

Recommended Background

  • A technical background.
  • Experience in mining operations.

Ron Magill

Ron has 40+ years' experience in mineral processing and supervision. Due to coming up through the ranks and his close involvement with operating personnel he speaks the same language as the new operator and first time supervisor; having been there he knows what they need. Perhaps more importantly, through a keen interest in industrial psychology and communication theory, his courses are presented in terms that the layperson can understand, with just enough background information to de-mystify the world of mineral processing.

Gloria Magill

Gloria has worked in the hospitality industry off and on for the better part of 30 years. In that time she has supervised crews from just a couple of employees to a staff of more than fifty in the housekeeping department of a major hotel. Currently she is in the process of translating the "Guidelines for Frontline Supervisors" into French.