Blast Design and Assessment for Surface Mines and Quarries

Areas of Study: Mining

Qualifies for CMS

Premium Peer-Reviewed

This is a practical course that provides a review of blasting theory and blasting products, and emphasizes the design, assessment, optimization and safety of blasting practices for open cast mining and quarrying. Topics are presented in an applied manner and address the impact of blasting on mine design and mining efficiency. *** This is a premium course which has been peer-reviewed by a committee appointed by the Canadian Institute of Mining, Metallurgy and Petroleum (CIM) and the Society for Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration (SME).

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  • Audience Level:
  • Professional
  • Enrollment:
  • Required
  • Duration:
  • 30 hours

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  • Fee for Certification:
  • Not Available
  • Completion:
  • 60 days
  • CEUs:
  • 3.0 (30 PDHs)

Course Summary

Introduction

This is a practical course that provides a review of blasting theory and blasting products, and emphasizes the design, assessment and optimization of blasting practices. The course focuses on drilling and blasting as it is applied in surface mines and quarries. Design methodology for safe and efficient blasting is provided. Monitoring and assessment to improve blast performance and reduce blast vibrations are discussed and examples of optimization programs are provided to illustrate the process. Topics are presented in an applied manner and address the impact of blasting on mine design and overall mining efficiency.

Topics covered by the course include:

  • Explosives and Charging Systems
  • Initiating Devices and Systems
  • Production Bench Blasting
  • Overbreak Control and Secondary Blasting
  • Damage Control
  • Safety and Accident Prevention

Course Content

Blast Design and Assessment for Surface Mines and Quarries consists of 36 viewing sessions of 30 - 60 minutes each with supporting figures, tables and examples, a glossary of blasting and excavation terminology, and interactive course reviews. The course includes several short video clips on production blasting, interactive blasting tools, and integration with the Dictionary of Mining, Mineral and Related Terms. Course duration is equivalent to approximately 30 hours of viewing content.

Learning Outcomes

  • Discuss the principles of explosive / rock interaction and the influence of rock properties.
  • Discuss the principles and applications of different types of detonator-sensitive explosives and blasting agents and their selection.
  • Discuss the principles and applications of detonators, detonating cords, delays, primers and initiating systems.
  • Apply the knowledge gained to the design of bench blasting, including explosives and priming system selection, blasthole and blasthole pattern design, and initiation sequencing and delay allocation.
  • Discuss the principles of overbreak mechanisms, blast redesign, smoothwall blasting and secondary blasting.
  • Discuss the principles of vibration damage and control, flyrock, airblast and noise control, and safety and accident prevention.
  • Apply the knowledge gained to practical, efficient and safe production bench blasting.

Recommended Background

  • A degree in mining engineering, engineering geology or related discipline or a diploma in mining technology.

Dr. Alan Cameron

Alan Cameron grew up in Sudbury, Ontario and graduated from the Queen's University with a degree in Mining Engineering in 1977. He worked at Iron Ore Company of Canada in Labrador City then returned to Queen's (1980-1981) to complete an M.Sc. degree also in Mining Eng. He then moved to Tom Price, Western Australia to work at Hamersley Iron Pty. Ltd. This was followed by a two year secondment to the Western Australia School of Mines, Kalgoorlie, W.A. as a Senior Lecturer in Mining Engineering with a focus on Blasting and Slope Stability. Alan moved to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia in 1986 as a project leader with the Julius Kruttschnitt Mineral Research Centre (University of Queensland) where for seven years he managed applied research projects in explosives and blasting for the mining industry, conducted consulting assignments as well as completed a part time PhD degree (Mining Eng.).

In 1993 Alan joined Golder Associates Ltd. as a Senior Blasting Consultant and opened a new office in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. In 1995 he was made an Associate and in 2001 a Principal partner. Alan works in the mining group with a specialty in slope stability and blasting. He is a Registered Professional Engineer in the province of Ontario and a member of the International Society of Explosives Engineers.

Alan has undertaken numerous international consulting assignments as well as been involved in presenting annual blasting courses for the past nine years. He has published numerous technical papers on the subject of blasting and the impact of blasting on mining operations.

Bill Forsyth P.Eng

Bill Forsyth was born in northern Manitoba and graduated from the University of Manitoba with a degree in Geological Engineering in 1987. He began working for Golder Associates Ltd., an international consulting company, in 1987 as a Geotechnical Engineer. In 1994 he was made an Associate and in 2001 a Principal partner. Bill works in the mining group with a specialty in underground rock mechanics and blasting. He is a Registered Professional Engineer in the province of British Columbia and a member of the International Society of Explosives Engineers.

For the past six years he has taught drilling and blasting at the University of British Columbia as a Sessional Lecturer in the mining engineering department. In addition, he has been a co-leader of a number of blasting courses at other universities, colleges and mine sites. He has published numerous technical papers on the subject of blasting and blast induced damage.

Dr. Tom Kleine

Dr. Tom Kleine is an Associate and Specialist Engineer in Golder Associates' Seattle office. Tom's specialty is in blast design and the prediction of blast performance in fractured rock. He is responsible for the design and evaluation of blasting programs, vibration control, and damage avoidance. He has developed a suite of blast design and assessment programs.

Tom has worked in engineering computing since 1979, earning first his Masters degree in 1983 and PhD degree in 1988 for numerical simulations of process plants (MSc) and blasting (PhD). He was awarded the international Roca Medal in 1991 for his PhD thesis. His diverse computing experience includes developing: a robust "edutainment" mining simulation game for 'World Expo 88' (which had to work unattended 24/7 for six months); equipment monitoring software (signal analysis); three-dimensional engineering design software; image based size analysis; blast simulators; and enterprise level information systems for the US Department of Energy. He has also worked in underground and surface mines in the course of his research. He is currently responsible for managing and leading the Web/database development team at Golder Associates Inc. who as a team develop and support web based applications for public and private organizations.

His relevant programming skills include: Visual Basic, VBScript, Active Server Pages (ASP), ADO/RDO, VBA, JavaScript, Microsoft Access, Transact-SQL, and HTML. System level experience includes: Windows NT 4, Windows 2000, MS SQL Server, and utilities such as IIS and MTS.

JJ | 2010
The course is very relevant to blasting in general. However I think introducing more practical components involving scenario questions will be great.
WZ | 2007
All in all a good course. If I may suggest something ...Larger size illustrations would speed progress through some of the areas and allow better use of time.Thank you for a good course. I learned or validated much.
GA | 2015
The course content was well written and presented with illustrations. In my opinion, the course should include more video clips in each chapter or section that will help to clearly demonstrate some of the discussions.